Kathleen Willey Dissects Hillary Clinton


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Here we go again.  An article on the Monday, January 27 Washington Post carried this headline:  “With a two-year Iowa head start, Clinton backers off and running.” Once again, with The Post in the lead, the mainstream media are beginning to make it sound inevitable that Hillary Clinton will be the Democratic presidential nominee and a good bet to be the next president:


Hillary Rodham Clinton is not officially running for anything. But here in the first-in-the-nation caucus state that bedeviled her in 2008, Democrats are busy laying the groundwork for what they see as Clinton’s near-certain 2016 presidential campaign.


Over a marathon day of strategy sessions, the Democratic Party’s patchwork coalition was fully represented: labor leaders, elected officials, statewide and local candidates, liberal activists, women, gays, seniors and 20-somethings. State party chairman Scott Brannen was here, too, as were strategists and foot soldiers who helped President Obama’s 2008 Iowa triumph…


The organizing effort demonstrated that, should Clinton run, it will be very difficult for Vice President Biden or another Democrat to mount a credible challenge. Priorities USA Action, the heavyweight liberal super PAC that led attacks against Republican Mitt Romney in 2012, has reoriented itself to fund a media campaign supporting Clinton.


One may be fairly certain that the former Clinton campaign activist and Clinton White House Social Office volunteer Kathleen Willey will not be among the Hillary tub-thumpers.  You may remember her as the woman interviewed on 60 Minutes who said that she was groped by Bill Clinton when, in desperate financial straits, she made a plea to him for a paying job.


It was completely ignored by the same media who keep touting Hillary, but in 2007, back when Hillary-the-next-president was being made to look as inevitable as she is now, Willey finally came out with a book.  It is called Target: Caught in the Crosshairs of Bill and Hillary Clinton.  Hillary is included in the title not just to make it timely during her first run for the presidency.  One gets the distinct impression from reading the book that in spite of the indignity she suffered at Bill’s hands, Willey genuinely regards Hillary as much the worse of the two.


Before we get into the particulars of Willey’s fear and loathing of Hillary, we must note that we can also see from the book that Willey is not exactly the sharpest knife in the drawer.  Reflecting on page 25 upon her attendance in 1992 at a political function at the Middleburg, VA, estate of Pamela Harriman, Willey, who comes from a family of Northern transplants to Richmond, describes the late world-class courtesan Harriman as, “The epitome of Southern gentility and elegance.”  She apparently doesn’t know that Pamela was English.  On the same page she describes her attendance at a Clinton fund-raiser on the grounds of a fancy home in Maryland “overlooking the Severin River.”  You’d think it was named for a pain reliever instead of a river in England.  


In spite of her own experience and the abundance of evidence to the contrary, Willey also seems to have bought the official nonsense on the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent W. Foster, Jr.  “Though Vince was tall, thin, handsome, and came from the right side of the street,” she writes on page 48, “he didn’t have the tough skin that the Clintons have.  Vince took a lot of political hits and the press really beat up on him.  On July 20, 1993, he went to a park outside of Washington D.C., put a gun in his mouth, and shot himself.”  It’s even more surprising that she should believe that Foster committed suicide while she expresses very strong suspicions that her own husband didn’t.


Though Willey, when it comes to things she has read or heard, might be as gullible and deceived as most of the rest of us, when it comes to her own direct experience what she says has the clear ring of truth.  Her profile of Hillary on pp. 83-84 combines her observations during her days in the White House with what she has gleaned from a number of books.  Here it is in its entirety:


Right outside our door, the rickety elevator took people from the basement to the top floor.  We saw everyone who got out of that old elevator—and we’d hear them.  Some people we heard more than others. 


When Hillary got off the elevator on the way to her office, which was next to ours, we all knew what kind of day it was going to be on our floor.  She would emerge with her entourage, cursing up a storm.  And all day long, we heard her raised voice through the wall.  Hillary always seemed to be miserable, unhappy, and angry.  Christopher Andersen, who wrote American Evita, said in an interview, “The staff was not afraid of Bill Clinton, the staff was afraid of Hillary Clinton—they were terrified of her.  She had a tremendous temper.”


She didn’t reserve her tirades for staff.  She made the president plenty miserable, too.  David Gergen wrote, “A chipper president would arrive at the office in the morning, almost whistling as he whipped through papers.  A phone would ring.  It was a call from upstairs at the residence…his mood would darken, his attention wander, and hot words would spew out….” FBI agent Gary Aldrich wrote that he heard Hillary cuss at Bill about a newspaper article.  “Come back here, you asshole!” she yelled at him.  “Where the fuck do you think you’re going?”


That’s the Hillary I saw.  I’ve walked behind her when she was cursing an aide with a very foul mouth.  Then she would see somebody who mattered and instantly pour it on, all sweetness and light.  A doey-eyed expression on her face, she’d act so sincere.  The minute they were gone, she’d turn around and explode again, cussing a blue streak.  Lt. Col. Robert “Buzz” Patterson wrote in Dereliction of Duty, “While I got used to Hillary’s wrath, her ability to turn it off and on amazed me.”  She was one of the phoniest people I have ever seen.


Hillary treated her Secret service agents like dirt.  These were really good people—disciplined men and women with military backgrounds—who had a solid sense of how things should be done.  But the Clintons hate the military.  Hillary especially made it clear.  Many of those guys were former Marines and some had gone to Vietnam.  She saw this as reason enough to be horrible to them.


She spoke to her Secret Service agents just as she had to the state trooper bodyguards in Arkansas.  Once, when one of her bodyguards greeted her with, “Good morning,” Hillary replied, “Fuck off!  It’s enough that I have to see you shit-kickers every day.  I’m not going to talk to you, too.  Just do your goddamn job and keep your mouth shut.” As first lady, she maintained this attitude.  On another occasion, she reportedly ordered a Secret service agent to carry her bags, though he was reluctant to do so because “he wanted to keep his hands free in case of an incident.” Hillary’s response to the diligent agent was, “If you want to remain on this detail, get your fucking ass over here and grab those bags.” In yet another incident, the first lady said to the Secret Service detail in charge of protecting her life, “Stay the fuck back, stay the fuck away from me!  Don’t come within ten yards of me, or else!...Just fucking do as I say, okay?  That was our first lady!  With obviously more class than she had, those men endured her with integrity.  But I felt badly for them.


One also has to feel bad for Kathleen Willey, who one might remember was courted by the big Democratic fund-raiser and moneybags Nathan Landow, but now sees herself as “collateral damage of the Clintons” and is pleading for assistance to prevent her house from being foreclosed upon.  Her principles, which one gathers from her book moved her to reject Landow (“… his looks belied him.  He was a bully—very gruff, profane, and rude.”), seemed to have landed her in big financial trouble once again.  The sales of Target must not have gone very well, which is a shame, because the book’s importance looms large once again with 2016 fast approaching.


Hillary, the Enabler


The problem with Hillary, you see, as one gathers from Willey, is not just that Hillary is a harpy and a harridan.  The worst of it is that Hillary as a politician has been effectively sold to many women as some great feminist liberal when in practice she could hardly be more completely the opposite.  As Willey has discovered, Bill Clinton is not just an inveterate philanderer, but he is a serial abuser of women, and Hillary is his primary enabler:


According to former Arkansas state auditor Julia Hughes Jones, Hillary kept tabs on Bill’s womanizing, not so she could get him to stop or to fight with him about monogamy, but so she could head off any repercussions.  “Every time he was out and Hillary knew where he went,” Jones said, “she would call behind him to see what she needed to do to take care of it.”


According to Thomas Kuiper, who wrote I’ve Always Been a Yankee Fan, “Hillary sent out a group of investigators known as the ‘Truth Squad ‘while Clinton was Arkansas governor, to discourage many of Bill’s former lovers from going public.”  One wonders how they might have “discouraged” these women.  (p. 193)


Willey’s book is replete with examples of how they tried to discourage her, from a personal threat delivered by a passing jogger near her Richmond-area home to the killing of her cat.  One of the discouragements was delivered in the form of a chilling “look” that she got from Hillary herself.  Setting the stage, Willey was a member of the U.S. delegation at the World Summit for Social Development in Copenhagen in 1995.  The Oval Office “assault” incident was well behind her.  This was her first paying job for the federal government, and it had come as a result of her repeated letters to Bill Clinton asking for one.  Hillary Clinton headed up the delegation:


The people in our delegation worked many evenings into wee hours of the morning, day after day, and all they wanted was to meet Hillary.  But they were essentially told, “She doesn’t have time for you.” It wasn’t going to happen.


“Well, that’s awful,” I said, always the fixer.  “I’m going to have to do something about that.”


I found one of her people.  “What’s it going to take?”  I asked.  “Ten minutes?  Fifteen minutes?  It’s the least she can do for them, you know.  If she can stand up and make a speech for thirty minutes, she can meet these people.”


So they arranged it.  I stood at the door to this room and cleared everybody who went in.  Hillary finally came in and shook a few hands.  Then somebody said, “If you don’t mind, we’d like to go around the room and introduce everybody.” Everyone stood in a large circle around the room and the introductions went around.  Standing near her, I was the last.  When it came around to me I said, “Kathleen Willey, formerly of your Social Office.” I thought maybe she would recognize me.  All I received was an icy cold glare.  I looked at her and we made eye contact, and I shuddered.  She knows, I thought to myself.  Oh God, she knows!  I felt chills.  Goose bumps stood up on my arms.  In that moment, I knew that she knew who I was.  She didn’t speak.  She turned back to the roomful of people and poured on the graciousness.  She thanked everyone and left. (pp. 90-91)


In the succeeding paragraph, Willey alludes to a similar incident that Juanita Broaddrick experienced.  Broaddrick says Bill raped her when he was Arkansas’s attorney general.    We do not have to rely upon Willey’s account of Broaddrick’s subsequent Hillary encounter.   Her “Open Letter to Hillary Clinton,” written in 2000, is on the Internet.  Here is an excerpt:


I have no doubt that you are the same conniving, self-serving person you were twenty-two years ago when I had the misfortune to meet you. When I see you on television, campaigning for the New York senate race, I can see the same hypocrisy in your face that you displayed to me one evening in 1978. You have not changed.


I remember it as though it was yesterday. I only wish that it were yesterday and maybe there would still be time to do something about what your husband, Bill Clinton, did to me. There was a political rally for Mr. Clinton's bid for governor of Arkansas. I had obligated myself to be at this rally prior to my being assaulted by your husband in April, 1978. I had made up my mind to make an appearance and then leave as soon as the two of you arrived. This was a big mistake, but I was still in a state of shock and denial. You had questioned the gentleman who drove you and Mr. Clinton from the airport. You asked him about me and if I would be at the gathering. Do you remember? You told the driver, "Bill has talked so much about Juanita", and that you were so anxious to meet me. Well, you wasted no time. As soon as you entered the room, you came directly to me and grabbed my hand. Do you remember how you thanked me, saying "we want to thank you for everything that you do for Bill". At that point, I was pretty shaken and started to walk off. Remember how you kept a tight grip on my hand and drew closer to me? You repeated your statement, but this time with a coldness and look that I have seen many times on television in the last eight years. You said, "Everything you do for Bill". You then released your grip and I said nothing and left the gathering.


What did you mean, Hillary? Were you referring to my keeping quiet about the assault I had suffered at the hands of your husband only two weeks before? Were you warning me to continue to keep quiet? We both know the answer to that question.  


You can listen to Broaddrick’s account of the incident in her interview on YouTube entitled “Hillary Threatened Juanita Broaddrick 2 Weeks After Rape.  “I think she’s always known; I think she’s always covered up for him…I can’t imagine someone covering up what a man, her husband, has done just for the sake of power,” Broaddrick concludes.


Anybody but Hillary?


Kathleen Willey’s motivation for coming out with her book when she did, in 2007, is precisely the same as my publishing what I had known for a long time in my article “Is Hillary Clinton a Lesbian?” which I posted on July 29, 2007.   This thoroughly reprehensible woman was getting entirely too close to a return to the White House.   Here is how Willey put it in her preface:


Afer ten years of living my private life, I need to come forward again, to remind America, especially American women, what Hillary and her husband will do.  It is not a matter of what they are capable of doing, but what they have done in their lust for the presidency.  They have wielded an ugly power over me and over many other women and witnesses.  They will do it again and, worst of all, they will do it in the name of feminism!


America is ready to elect a woman president.  The planets are perfectly aligned in Hillary’s favor, and many women will likely vote for her just because she is a woman, because it is time for a woman to be our president.  But Hillary Clinton is the wrong woman.


This is why I need to tell my story.  I know it will open old wounds for me, subject me to more dirty tricks, and make me vulnerable to an onslaught of attacks.  As an American and as a woman I have to share my story, because Hillary Clinton cannot claim to be an advocate for women if she victimizes us when no one is looking.  She cannot claim to support our empowerment when she uses power to betray us.  She cannot claim to be a feminist when she enables her husband as a sexual predator.  Hillary claims one thing and does another.  She is a lie.  (pp. xii-xiii)


Don’t expect anyone to point out the irony in the pages of the newspaper, but just above the Washington Post article on the big push for Hillary in Iowa was an article headlined “Behavior by brass vexes military.”  It was all about the recent sexual misconduct of a number of high-ranking officers, all of whom are only a few notches down from the level of commander-in-chief.


David Martin

January 30, 2014




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